Updates on Star Trek: Discovery Season 3, Michelle Yeoh's Section 31 Spin-Off, and More

A strange Hellraiser teaser and a new image from Spider-Man: Homecoming. Jon Favreau tries to quell rumblings of the so-called shot-for-shot remake of The Lion King. Avengers: Endgame tie-in marketing won’t stop and our first look at the series finale of Gotham. Friday spoilers are rolling right this way…

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Source: io9 – Updates on Star Trek: Discovery Season 3, Michelle Yeoh’s Section 31 Spin-Off, and More

Facebook launch video captions have issues: “Core pressures Asian looks good”

An Antares rocket built by Northrop Grumman launched on Wednesday afternoon, boosting a Cygnus spacecraft with 3.4 tons of cargo toward the International Space Station. The launch from Wallops Island, Virginia, went flawlessly, and the spacecraft arrived at the station on Friday.

However, when NASA’s International Space Station program posted the launch video to its Facebook page on Thursday, there was a problem. Apparently the agency’s caption service hadn’t gotten to this video clip yet, so viewers with captions enabled were treated not just to the glory of a rocket launch, but the glory of Facebook’s automatically generated crazywords. As of Thursday morning, 86,995 people had watched the Facebook video.

Some of the captions are just hilariously bad. For example, when the announcer triumphantly declares, “And we have liftoff of the Antares NG-11 mission to the ISS,” the automatically generated caption service helpfully says, “And we have liftoff of the guitarist G 11 mission to the ice sets.”

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Source: Ars Technica – Facebook launch video captions have issues: “Core pressures Asian looks good”

China Bans the Word 'Leica' on Social Media

When a promotional video for German camera maker Leica hit the web this week, it looked like a bold statement about the hard work done by photojournalists around the world. But the company is now distancing itself from the 5-minute video after Chinese social media users cried foul and the word “Leica” was banned on…

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Source: Gizmodo – China Bans the Word ‘Leica’ on Social Media

FTC's Facebook investigation could focus on Zuckerberg

Facebook’s privacy troubles just keep on coming, one after another — just recently, it revealed that Instagram stored millions of passwords in plain text. In an effort to force the social network to be more conscious of its data privacy practices, f…

Source: Engadget – FTC’s Facebook investigation could focus on Zuckerberg

Doctors Used HIV To Develop Cure For 'Bubble Boy' Disease

An anonymous reader quotes a report from the BBC: U.S. scientists say they used HIV to make a gene therapy that cured eight infants of severe combined immunodeficiency, or “bubble boy” disease. The babies, born with little to no immune protection, now have fully functional immune systems. Untreated babies with this disorder have to live in completely sterile conditions and tend to die as infants. The gene therapy involved collecting the babies’ bone marrow and correcting the genetic defect in their DNA soon after their birth. The “correct” gene — used to fix the defect — was inserted into an altered version of one of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Researchers said most of the babies were discharged from the hospital within one month. Dr Ewilina Mamcarz of St Jude, an author of the study, said in a statement: “These patients are toddlers now, who are responding to vaccinations and have immune systems to make all immune cells they need for protection from infections as they explore the world and live normal lives. This is a first for patients with SCID-X1 (the most common type of SCID).” The study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Doctors Used HIV To Develop Cure For ‘Bubble Boy’ Disease

Is It Safe to Leave My Smartphone on My Wireless Charger?

Welcome to another edition of Lifehacker’s tech-advice column, brought to you by copious amounts of DayQuil—thanks to whoever gave me the terrible cold I’ve been dealing with the last week or so. Since I still feel like I could easily pack eight more hours of sleep into my schedule today, I’ll cut right to this week’s…

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Source: LifeHacker – Is It Safe to Leave My Smartphone on My Wireless Charger?

Mesa's Vulkan Drivers See More Extension Work Ahead Of The 19.1 Branching

Mesa 19.1 is due to be released at the end of May and for that to be the feature freeze is in two weeks followed by the weekly release candidates. With the feature development ending soon for this next quarterly Mesa release, the Radeon “RADV” and Intel “ANV” Vulkan driver developers in particular have been quite busy on their remaining feature work…

Source: Phoronix – Mesa’s Vulkan Drivers See More Extension Work Ahead Of The 19.1 Branching

BlackBerry's marginally upgraded, red-accented KEY2 is out today

The BlackBerry KEY2 Red Edition lands in the US today with double the storage out of the box (128GB). More of a stop-gap than a sequel, the handset also packs Hub+ software improvements and refreshed versions of the BlackBerry Hub and BlackBerry Cale…

Source: Engadget – BlackBerry’s marginally upgraded, red-accented KEY2 is out today

Unexpected protection added to Microsoft Edge subverts IE security

Unexpected protection added to Microsoft Edge subverts IE security

Enlarge (credit: Brian Smithson / Flickr)

A researcher has uncovered strange and unexpected behavior in Windows 10 that allows remote attackers to steal data stored on hard drives when a user opens a malicious file downloaded with the Edge browser.

The threat partially surfaced last week when a different researcher, John Page, reported what he called a flaw in Internet Explorer. Page claimed that when using the file manager to open a maliciously crafted MHT file downloaded with Internet Explorer, the browser uploaded one or more files to a remote server. According to Page, the vulnerability affected the most recent version of IE, version 11, running on Windows 7, Windows 10, and Windows Server 2012 R2 with all security updates installed. (It’s no longer clear whether any OS other than Windows 10 is affected, at least for some users. More about that in a moment.)

Below this paragraph in Page’s post was a video demonstration of the proof-of-concept exploit Page created. It shows a booby-trapped MHT file triggering an upload of the host computer’s system.ini file to a remote server. Interestingly, while Page’s post says his exploit is triggered when the malicious file is downloaded by IE, and makes no mention of Edge at all, the video shows the file being downloaded with the newer Microsoft browser.

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Source: Ars Technica – Unexpected protection added to Microsoft Edge subverts IE security

HP Expands Its Chromebook Offering With A Sleek 15-Inch IPS Model Well Under $500

HP Expands Its Chromebook Offering With A Sleek 15-Inch IPS Model Well Under $500
HP has announced the new Chromebook 15 which is priced at $449. HP offers the machine in Mineral Silver and Cloud Blue colors and both have a metal keyboard deck with a sandblasted finish and a ceramic-like white finished cover. As a Chromebook, the machine runs Chrome OS. 

Inside the Chromebook 15 has an Intel Pentium Gold 4417U processor

Source: Hot Hardware – HP Expands Its Chromebook Offering With A Sleek 15-Inch IPS Model Well Under 0

The Criterion Channel Should Be My Favorite Streaming Platform

It wasn’t so long ago that Netflix’s focus was on developing a curated library of titles rather than its own original, largely episodic content—and the nostalgics among us still pine for those days. With Filmstruck now deceased, the recently-launched Criterion Channel is close to being the ideal streaming platform for…

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Source: Gizmodo – The Criterion Channel Should Be My Favorite Streaming Platform

FreeBSD Images Reworked With ZFS On Linux Code Up For Testing

Last year FreeBSD developers decided to re-base their ZFS file-system code based on the “ZFS On Linux” port rather than the Illumos source tree where they originally had been acquiring the support for this BSD. There’s now FreeBSD 12 and FreeBSD 13/Head images available for testing of this re-worked ZFS file-system support…

Source: Phoronix – FreeBSD Images Reworked With ZFS On Linux Code Up For Testing

Facebook AI turns real people into controllable game characters

Facebook’s AI Research team has created an AI called Vid2Play that can extract playable characters from videos of real people, creating a much higher-tech version of ’80s full-motion video (FMV) games like Night Trap. The neural networks can analyze…

Source: Engadget – Facebook AI turns real people into controllable game characters

Iron Man VR preview makes me want to put on nerdy headgear again

Trailer for PSVR game Marvel’s Iron Man VR

AUSTIN, Texas—In some ways, I am the worst candidate among the Ars Technica gaming braintrust to demo the world premiere of Iron Man VR, a video game slated to launch on PlayStation VR by the end of this year. I have never used a PSVR, let alone any VR headset between the pricey HTC Vive and the build-it-yourself Nintendo Labo VR. And I’m an inconsistent Marvel movie follower at best. If we don’t count the early 2000s Spider-Man trilogy, Black Panther is my only MCU reference point.

But maybe that actually makes me the best candidate to fake like Tony Stark via a bulky headset. There is no veneer of VR snobbery to rely on. Instead, I had simple questions: Is this fun? Would I do it again, and for longer?

After a 20-minute(ish) flight test with a rep from the devs at Camouflaj (the studio behind the upcoming PSVR game) nearby, I can still confidently say the old X-Men co-op arcade cabinet remains my favorite Marvel game of all-time. But I would absolutely be down to fly around a bit more in Iron Man’s ruby-red armor soon, which is probably good news for millions of VR and Marvel novices who might be intrigued by the possibility of becoming their own living-room Iron Person.

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Source: Ars Technica – Iron Man VR preview makes me want to put on nerdy headgear again

Rocket Report: A new Delta 2, Blue Origin inks with NASA, a fiery Falcon Heavy

The Rocket Report is published weekly.

Enlarge / The Rocket Report is published weekly. (credit: Arianespace)

Welcome to Edition 1.45 of the Rocket Report! This week, half of our stories concern the biggest rockets on the planet, from Blue Origin engine tests at Marshall Space Flight Center to NASA’s efforts to accelerate development of the Space Launch System.

As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don’t want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

Stratolaunch flies for the first time. The world’s largest airplane, nicknamed Roc, took to the skies for the first time on Saturday, April 13. The flight lasted 150 minutes, during which time the aircraft reached a maximum of 15,000 feet and a top speed of 189mph, Parabolic Arc reports. Backed by Microsoft-co-founder Paul Allen and built by Burt Rutan’s Scaled Composites, the aircraft is designed to air-launch satellites using boosters carried on the wing between its two fuselages.

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Source: Ars Technica – Rocket Report: A new Delta 2, Blue Origin inks with NASA, a fiery Falcon Heavy