Vintage 1983 Atari Commercial With Bad 'Centipede' Themed Rap

atari-centipede-commercial-rap.jpg

This is a vintage Atari commercial from 1983 advertising ‘Centipede’, which my brother Frank was always really great at. I was not so great, and I’m still not. At anything, really. The commercial features a not very good rap about the game. I’ll be honest, if that– “Rap was a website, it would be Geekologie.” Oh, hands down.

Keep going for video.

Source: Geekologie – Vintage 1983 Atari Commercial With Bad ‘Centipede’ Themed Rap

Grab The New Nintendo Switch Lite For Just $169 With This Red Hot Deal

Grab The New Nintendo Switch Lite For Just $169 With This Red Hot Deal
The Nintendo Switch Lite was just released this past Friday, and it’s already a pretty nice bargain compared to the original Switch. The original Nintendo Switch is priced at $299, while its “Lite” counterpart comes in at only $199.

However, a new deal today over at Rakuten (via seller GamerCandy) has the console for $199 — its regular

Source: Hot Hardware – Grab The New Nintendo Switch Lite For Just 9 With This Red Hot Deal

Disney CEO Explains Twitter Perfectly: 'Why Am I Doing This? Why Do I Endure This Pain?'

It’s no secret that Disney was very interested in buying Twitter back in 2016, but the House of Mouse never went through with the deal. Disney CEO Bob Iger has explained the company’s thinking about Twitter in his new book, The Ride of a Lifetime, and he really speaks for all of its regular users.

Read more…



Source: Gizmodo – Disney CEO Explains Twitter Perfectly: ‘Why Am I Doing This? Why Do I Endure This Pain?’

AMD Navi 10 Firmware Finally Lands In The Linux-Firmware Tree

While AMD has provided open-source Radeon RX 5700 series (Navi 10) support since launch and that code since worked into the various mainline code-bases from the Linux kernel to Mesa, one kink in their support has been their binary microcode images not being available from the reference linux-firmware.git location as needed to initialize the hardware. That Navi 10 firmware/microcode issue has finally been rectified with the images landing this morning…

Source: Phoronix – AMD Navi 10 Firmware Finally Lands In The Linux-Firmware Tree

Compliance, and why Raspberry Pi 4 may not be available in your country yet

In June we launched Raspberry Pi 4, and it has been selling extremely well, with over 1 million devices already made. We launched the product in a select set of countries in June, and ever since, we’ve been steadily making it available in more and more places; currently, Raspberry Pi 4 is on the market in 55 countries.

Raspberry Pi 4 and compliance

There have been many questions around why Raspberry Pi 4 isn’t available in certain countries, and this post will give you some insight into this.

Whenever a company wants to sell a product on a market, it first has to prove that selling it is safe and legal. Compliance requirements vary between different products; rules that would apply to a complicated machine like a car will, naturally, not be the same as those that apply to a pair of trainers (although there is some overlap in the Venn diagram of rules).

Raspberry Pi Integrator Programme

Regions of the world within each of which products have to be separately tested

Different countries usually have slightly different sets of regulations, and testing has to be conducted at an accredited facility for the region the company intends to sell the product in.

Compliance for a country is broken into the following: testing, certification, and marking.

Testing

Compliance testing requirements vary from country to country; there is no single set of tests or approvals that allow you to sell a product globally. Often, it’s necessary to test the product within the country that compliance is needed for; only some countries accept test reports from other countries.

For the launch of Raspberry Pi 4, we tested to EU, FCC (USA), and IC (Canada) regulations, and we’ve used these test reports to apply for compliance in as many countries as possible.

Certification

Once testing is complete, a certificate is issued for the product. The time this takes is variable, and some countries post such certificates online publicly so people can search for products.

Testing in the remaining countries that require testing to happen in-country is now complete, and the respective certificates are being granted for Raspberry Pi 4 right now. However, whilst the certificate is being issued, the product isn’t yet compliant; we need to add the regulatory markings for this to happen.

Marking

Like testing requirements, product marking requirements may differ from country to country. The main difficulty of marking is that many countries require a unique certificate number to be printed on packaging, leaflets, and the product itself.

Some countries, such as the USA, allow companies to create the certificate number themselves (hence jazzy numbers like 2ABCB-RPI4B), and so we can place these on the product before launch. In other countries, however, the certificate number is issued at the end of the certification process.

For Raspberry Pi 4, we are now at the final stage for compliance: marking. All our certificates have been issued, and we are updating the packaging, leaflet, and product with the various certificate numbers needed to unlock the last few countries.

The countries that we have certificates for that require markings to be added: China, South Korea, Brazil, Mexico, Taiwan, Chile, and Japan.

The process is beginning, and Raspberry Pi 4 should be available in these markets soon.

We post all our product compliance information online.

Conclusion

This is a broad overview of the compliance process for Raspberry Pi, and there are some details omitted for the sake of clarity. Compliance is a complex and varied task, but it is very important to demonstrate that Raspberry Pi 4 is a compliant, safe, and trustworthy product.

We aim to make Raspberry Pi 4 available in more countries than ever before, ensuring that everyone can take advantage of the amazing features, power, and cost-effectiveness it offers.

The post Compliance, and why Raspberry Pi 4 may not be available in your country yet appeared first on Raspberry Pi.



Source: Raspberry Pi – Compliance, and why Raspberry Pi 4 may not be available in your country yet

Linux 5.4 Brings Support For Wacom's MobileStudio Pro 13, Logitech Lightspeed Receivers

Jiri Kosina on Sunday sent out the HID subsystem updates for the in-development Linux 5.4 kernel. The HID pull once again features support for several new devices particularly on the Logitech side…

Source: Phoronix – Linux 5.4 Brings Support For Wacom’s MobileStudio Pro 13, Logitech Lightspeed Receivers

Atoms spin backwards while flying along a surface

Image of a car's wheel.

Enlarge / Atoms are a bit like this wheel, but they spin backwards while moving forward. (credit: Ross Elliott / Flickr)

Have you ever noticed that when a car is filmed, sometimes the wheels appear to be turning backwards? For cars, having the wheels rotate in the opposite sense to the car’s motion is an artifact. But, for atoms, it may actually happen.

Picture this

Let’s set the scene. A flat sheet of metal, hanging in the vacuum: the camera pans to see a single atom moving flat-out a few nanometers above the surface. The electrons surrounding the nucleus of the atom push the electrons in the metal away from the metal’s surface, creating a kind of bow wave of charge in front of the nucleus and a wake of charge behind it. What we’re looking at is the very picture of a quantum salt flat racer.

The forces that generate the bow wave and wake are carried by virtual photons that are exchanged between the metal surface and the atom. In the exchange process, the atom will emit a steady stream of real photons in the direction of travel. The momentum kick from launching these photons slows the atom. This is, ultimately, friction for a single atom.

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Source: Ars Technica – Atoms spin backwards while flying along a surface

Challenging Facebook and Google, Apple's New OS Warns Users When Data Is Collected

An anonymous reader quotes Forbes:

Apple’s updated operating system will now show you how often your location has been recorded and by which apps. It will do this proactively via a pop up, which shows a map of where you have been tracked, including the option to allow or limit it. Previously, many apps were able to track you in the background without your knowledge. They were able to collect vast amounts of data on you, which they could use to target you with advertising.

Along the same theme, another blow to apps such as Facebook and WhatsApp is a change in Apple’s iOS 13 that will not allow messaging and calling apps to run in the background when the programs are not actively in use. Before, apps such as these were able to collect information on what you were doing on your device.

People are certainly becoming more aware of the way their data is used, following incidents such as the Cambridge Analytica scandal. In this context, many of the changes could be seen as a direct blow to Apple’s rivals Google and Facebook: iOS 13 highlights their data collection practices and gives iPhone users the opportunity to stop them. In this way, it’s an attack on Facebook and Google’s business models. It’s true: There are many apps that track you and collect data on you, and iOS 13 will affect all of these. But it is also worth considering the position that Apple holds in the market. When Apple speaks, people listen.

Forbes concludes that these features in iOS 13 “could encourage even the most apathetic Apple users to care more about their privacy.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Challenging Facebook and Google, Apple’s New OS Warns Users When Data Is Collected

Google vows to never store Assistant recordings without permission

Google has announced that it will do more to protect user privacy for its Google Assistant and confirmed that it doesn’t save voice recordings by default. The news comes after revelations that a Google contractor was leaking private user audio record…

Source: Engadget – Google vows to never store Assistant recordings without permission

Reasons Why You Should Use A CMS To Run Your Site

A content management system [CMS] is a software application used in the production and management of a website. It allows anyone, even the less savvy on technology to place content on the website and keep track of it without complications.  For many businesses, an enterprise CMS is the core of the business. Using CMS to […]

The post Reasons Why You Should Use A CMS To Run Your Site appeared first on TGDaily.



Source: TG Daily – Reasons Why You Should Use A CMS To Run Your Site

24 hours with Huawei’s Mate 30 Pro: Incredible cameras, gloomy future

Huawei is at the center of a storm, barracked by sanctions that block it from working with its key partners. Its latest handset, the Mate 30 Pro, runs Android, Google’s operating system, but can’t access Google’s services, so no Google Play, Google M…

Source: Engadget – 24 hours with Huawei’s Mate 30 Pro: Incredible cameras, gloomy future

A Day with the Huawei Mate 30 Pro: Kirin 990 and 7680 FPS Slow Motion Tests

Last week Huawei launched its latest flagship smartphone, the Mate 30 Pro, featuring its latest Kirin 990 chipset. At the heart of the new hardware is a waterfall wrap-around screen, as well as new camera tools to help it record slow motion video up to 7680 frames per second, above and beyond what is currently available. The new smartphones will not come with the Google Play Store and applications, due to the US-China trade war and Huawei being placed on the US Entity List, however Huawei has promised to look into unlocking the boot loader and injecting $1B into its own App Store to drive new applications. 5G versions of the Mate 30 and Mate 30 Pro are due out later this year, but we managed to get access to a device for a day or so for some hands-on experience.



Source: AnandTech – A Day with the Huawei Mate 30 Pro: Kirin 990 and 7680 FPS Slow Motion Tests